Killini, Greece

Suspension bridge

Suspension bridge

A dawn departure saw us speeding along with the 2kt current under the new suspension bridge connecting Rion with Andirrion (the Peloponnese with the mainland).

Would you believe it was necessary to call traffic control on VHF channel 14 for permission to transit the bridge? The radio operator asked for my yachts dimensions and couldn’t quite digest a mast height of 7 meters, so in their books, I am now classified as a seven meter yacht with a mast height of 17 meters…

Makes me feel grand!

Rafting up with our French neighbours

Rafting up with our French neighbours

Our next port of call (Killini) was the antithesis of Navpaktos. The port is about as interesting as doing boat maintenance. 😉

Though to be fair, people interested in watching large ferries maneuver and load at all hours might find Killini rather special. Unfortunately, I’m not one of those, but I did give it a try. 🙂

Upon arrival the inner harbor was full, and we were obliged to ask permission to raft up for the night on what turned out to be (in our inflated opinions), the most interesting boat in port. A well traveled all aluminium cruiser owned by a French family who had been living aboard for several years. They were delightful company.

The town itself had little to offer (other than free Internet Wi-Fi that needed to be reset every hour), so by 11pm the following evening we cast off and motored toward our next destination, the port of Argostoli in Kefallina (also Cephalonia).

Westward toward the Corinthian canal!

Corinthian canal

Corinthian canal

Departing Aigina at sunrise, Matt and I motored westward toward the Corinthian canal entrance. By 1:30pm we lay moored by the canal authorities control tower where I paid the 95 Euro transit fee. Several boats were on route from the western end, and as they approached I moved off the quay to avoid their wash. Easy.

Just after 2pm we were literally waved through (so much for standing by on channel 11 VHF) and Eileen of Avoca majestically (if you ignore Matt’s laundry hanging everywhere) motored into the Gulf of Corinth.

Spectacular! Especially when the sky darkened, storm clouds moved in and lightning forked menacingly over the mountains to the south. That sort of spectacular I can do without, especially when it is accompanied by rain. Thoroughly drenched, we motored on into the night arriving in Navpaktos by daybreak.